Song Lyric Sunday: Bird in the Sky

I am once again joining in with Song Lyric Sunday. The prompt this week is Bird/Fly/Sky/Wing. The song I selected fits several of these words.

For today’s theme, I have chosen an oldie from my own country of the Netherlands. Paloma blanca (also called Una paloma blanca) was written by Hans Bouwens (aka George Baker) in 1975 and was popular across Europe and even in the United States. I never quite understood what a palm tree did in the lyrics, until I discovered today that “paloma” means “dove”.

Song Title: Paloma Blanca
Songwriter: Hans Bouwens
Band: George Baker Selection
Release Date: March 22, 1975

When the sun shines on the mountains
And the night is on the run
It’s a new day, it’s a new way
And I fly up to the sun
I can feel the morning sunlight
I can smell the new-born hay
I can hear God’s voices calling
From my golden sky-light way
Una paloma blanca
I’m just a bird in the sky
Una paloma blanca
Over the mountain I fly
No one can take my freedom away
Once I had my share of losing
Once they locked me on a chain
Yes, they tried to break my power
Oh, I still can feel the pain
Una paloma blanca
I’m just a bird in the sky
Una paloma blanca
Over the mountain I fly
No one can take my freedom away

Song Lyric Sunday: Cowboy

It’s Sunday and that means it’s time for another installment of Song Lyric Sunday. I don’t participate each week, but this week, the theme was easy. For the theme of Cowboy/Gun/Hat/Horse/Western, I am choosing one of the songs on my Country playlist on Spotify. I don’t remember how I first learned about this song, but its meaning definitely speaks to me.

Song Title: Faster Horses (The Cowboy and the Poet)
Singer/Songwriter: Tom T. Hall
Release Date: 1995

He was an old-time cowboy, don’t you understand
His eyes were sharp as razor blades his face was leather tan
His toes were pointed inward from a-hangin’ on a horse
He was an old philosopher, of course
He was so thin I swear you could have used him for a whip
He had to drink a beer to keep his britches on his hips
I knew I had to ask him about the mysteries of life
He spit between his boots and he replied
“It’s faster horses, younger women,
Older whiskey, and more money”
He smiled and all his teeth were covered with tobacco stains
He said, “It don’t do men no good to pray for peace and rain.
Peace and rain is just a way to say prosperity,
And buffalo chips is all it means to me.”
I told him I was a poet, I was lookin’ for the truth
I do not care for horses, whiskey,
Women or the loot I said I was a writer,
My soul was all on fire
He looked at me an’ he said, “You are a liar.”
“It’s faster horses, younger women,
Older whiskey, and more money”
Well, I was disillusioned, if I say the least
I grabbed him by the collar and I jerked him to his feet
There was something cold and shiny layin’ by my head
So I started to believe the things he said
Well, my poet days are over and I’m back to being me
As I enjoy the peace and comfort of reality
If my boy ever asks me what it is that
I have learned I think that I will readily affirm
“It’s faster horses, younger women,
Older whiskey, and more money”
“It’s faster horses, younger women,
Older whiskey, and more money”

Song Lyric Sunday: Movies

I am rather late to join in with Song Lyric Sunday and I’m twisting the prompt a little. After all, I rarely if ever watch movies, so I have no idea what songs are in them. For this reason, I’m going with a song that wasn’t a movie title song, but should have been. Tom Lehrer famously introduces this song that he proposes as the motion picture title song for the movie Oedipus Rex. I am too lazy to look up the lyrics that include the introduction though.

Song Title: Oedipus Rex
Singer/Songwriter: Tom Lehrer
Release Date: 1959

From the Bible to the popular song
There’s one theme that we find right along
Of all ideals they hail as good
The most sublime is motherhood

There was a man though, who it seems
Once carried this ideal to extremes
He loved his mother and she loved him
And yet his story is rather grim

There once lived a man named Oedipus Rex
You may have heard about his odd complex
His name appears in Freud’s index
Cause he loved his mother

His rivals used to say quite a bit
That as a monarch he was most unfit
But still in all they had to admit
That he loved his mother

Yes, he loved his mother like no other
His daughter was his sister and his son was his brother
One thing on which you can depend is
He sure knew who a boy’s best friend is

When he found what he had done
He tore his eyes out, one by one
A tragic end to a loyal son
Who loved his mother

So be sweet and kind to mother
Now and then have a chat
Buy her candy or some flowers
Or a brand new hat
But maybe you had better let it go at that

Or you may find yourself with a quite complex complex
And you may end up like Oedipus
I’d rather marry a duck-billed platypus
Than end up like old Oedipus Rex

Song Lyric Sunday: Occupation

I haven’t participated in Song Lyric Sunday in months and for a while, I couldn’t find it. Turns out Helen, the founder of the challenge, is struggling with her health. Jim over at A Unique Title for Me is temporarily hosting the challenge now. This week’s theme is Occupation.

The first song that came to mind is a song I used to listen to a lot in the early 2000s, and some later too when I didn’t have an active Internet connection. I had a Jim Croce CD that I’d borrowed from my parents and never given back. Here is the song I’m referring to. For those not aware, I had no idea what this song was about when I listened to it a lot, since I grew up in an era past operators. For those who didn’t grow up with landlines at all, can you imagine this?

Title: Operator (That’s Not the Way It Feels)

Singer/Songwriter: Jim Croce

Release Date: 1972

Operator, well could you help me place this call
See, the number on the match book is old and faded
She’s living in L.A.
With my best old ex-friend Ray
A guy she said she knew well and sometimes hated

[Chorus]
But isn’t that the way they say it goes
Well let’s forget all that
And give me the number if you can find it
So I can call just to tell ’em I’m fine, and to show
I’ve overcome the blow
I’ve learned to take it well
I only wish my words
Could just convince myself
That it just wasn’t real
But that’s not the way it feels

[Verse 2]
Operator, well could you help me place this call
Cause I can’t read the number that you just gave me
There’s something in my eyes
You know it happens every time
I think about the love that I thought would save me

[Chorus]
But isn’t that the way they say it goes
Well let’s forget all that
And give me the number if you can find it
So I can call just to tell ’em I’m fine, and to show
I’ve overcome the blow
I’ve learned to take it well
I only wish my words
Could just convince myself
That it just wasn’t real
But that’s not the way it feels

No, no, no, no
That’s not the way it feels

[Verse 3]
Operator, well let’s forget about this call
There’s no one there I really wanted to talk to
Thank you for your time
Ah, you’ve been so much more than kind
You can keep the dime

[Chorus]
But isn’t that the way they say it goes
Well let’s forget all that
And give me the number if you can find it
So I can call just to tell ’em I’m fine, and to show
I’ve overcome the blow
I’ve learned to take it well
I only wish my words
Could just convince myself
That it just wasn’t real
But that’s not the way it feels

Song Lyric Sunday: Car

It’s Sunday again and this week, the theme for Song Lyric Sunday is quite cool. It is “car”. Now I don’t care that much for pretty cars and am happy with our thirteen-year-old Suzuki Alto as long as it still goes. An exception though are songs about cars. Yeah, I love those.

My husband is a truck driver, so I’ve gotten to know quite a few truck driving songs. The song I selected though for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday is about a regular car.

My husband introduced Confederate Railroad to me a few months ago. He’s since moved on to other kinds of songs, most recently French chansons, but I still love me some good country and southern rock. So here goes.

Song title: Daddy Never Was the Cadillac Kind
Song writers: Dave Gibson, Bernie Nelson
Band: Confederate Railroad
Release Date: March 12, 1994

We were poor when I was a young’un
I don’t remember ever going hungry
Daddy made sure we didn’t do without
I went to school with some of these fellas
They had money and I was jealous
I didn’t know then what I know now
Daddy’d say you can’t judge a book by looking at its cover
It’s what’s inside that really matters

Daddy never was the Cadillac kind
He said some things just glitter and shine
He taught us that love was the one thing money couldn’t buy
Daddy never was the Cadillac kind

I left home right out of high school
Bought me a big car thought I was real cool
Cruisin’ around the old neighborhood
I’d see Dad after church on Sunday
I’d say you’ll have to go riding with me someday
He just said no, I never understood
He asked me how I bought it, I told him on credit
Daddy just smiled, I’ll never forget it

Daddy never was the Cadillac kind
He said some things just glitter and shine
He taught us that love was the one thing money couldn’t buy
Daddy never was the Cadillac kind

It took a while but now I’m grown
I’ve settled down with kids of my own
The more I give them
The more they want

Daddy left us last November
I don’t remember him ever looking better
All laid out in his Sunday best
I’m sure instead of all the attention
All he’d of wanted was a few words mentioned
A simple man simply laid to rest
As they drove him away in that big Cadillac
With a tear in my eye I had to laugh

Daddy never was the Cadillac kind
He said some things just glitter and shine
Just this once I hope daddy enjoyed the ride
Daddy never was the Cadillac kind

Monday’s Music Moves Me: Bourbon, Beer and Watermelon Wine

Yay guys, it’s Monday. My week is off to a great start with a long walk again this morning at day activities. I am snacking on cheese twists, because after all my husband moved the scale to the attic so it won’t show if I’ve gained weight. No, seriously I do still try to lose weight, but I’m allowed a cheat.

Monday also means it’s time for Monday’s Music Moves Me. Last week, I flaked out as I couldn’t think of songs to add. The theme was free choice, but still I wasn’t that musically-inclined. But now I am.

The theme for this week is songs with beverages in the title. Immediately, alcoholic beverages came to mind. I don’t drink alcohol, but I just love a good ol’ drinking song.

The first song I’m going to share is my favorite Blackberry Smoke song. Unlike with most other southern rock bands, I was the first in our home to discover Blackberry Smoke and introduced it to my husband rather than the other way around. This song is explicit, so a rather stark contrast to the nursery rhumes I shared two weeks ago, but who cares?

Next, I originally wanted to share Sweet Tequila, which I know from the German country band Truck Stop but was pretty sure of there’d be an English-language version. I couldn’t find it, nor could I find the Truck Stop version on YouTube, so I had to move on. Here then is a song I’m probably not the only one sharing. It’s one of several truly funny Dubliners songs.

Now that we’re talking beer anyway, I just got to share this song by Tom T. Hall.

I didn’t originally intend on posting more than one song by the same artist, but I just got to share this other Tom T. Hall song. Not because I like it, but because it means I can craft a nice title for this post.

Monday’s Music Moves Me: Nursery Rhymes About Animals

Yesterday, I wanted to participate in Song Lyric Sunday and I had the most fabulous song (haha) for the theme of “drive/driving”. Then I couldn’t find the lyrics, so I gave up. I however also discovered Monday’s Music Moves Me, another music-themed blog hop. The theme for today is “songs with animals in the title”.

I have not previously participated in this linky, so I don’t know whether it’s focused on just pop songs. Others are including The Lion Sleeps Tonight, which was going to be in my head all day long, so I had to replace it with another one. I picked a children’s song. My mother-in-law sings this rhyme regularly.

From there, I decided to look up more children’s songs on this theme. I remembered from a time I listened to a lot of nursery rhymes that there was one about Alice the [whatever] has five humps. I googled it and here it is.

From there, I decided to make this entire post about nursery rhymes, so here’s another lovely song I found.

And for my last song, I’m going to cheat a little and share one of my all-time favorite nursery rhymes. It doesn’t have an animal in the title, but I guess it has a whole farm of them, LOL.

What children’s songs with animal themes do you love?

Song Lyric Sunday: Drink

Yay, it’s time for Song Lyric Sunday again with the lovely theme of “Drink”. The song I’m sharing was introduced to me by my husband. He at one point was big into punk and Oi! music. As a result, I had to listen to songs by bands such as Booze & Glory and Cock Sparrer. I have come to love some of them too, including this one by The Business. For the record: I don’t drink and I cannot drive.

Song Title: Drinking and Driving
Song Writer: couldn’t find
Band: The Business
Release Date: 1985

Half past 5 I’m in the pub
Six O’clock it’s home for grub
Eight O’clock I’m back to the bar
Sod the walk I’ll take the car

[Chorus]

Knock it back
Have another one
Drinking and driving is so much fun

In the motor off you go
Not too fast and not too slow
Keep your head and keep your cool
Must avoid that rightful pull

As you meander down the road
Don’t forget your highway code
See the spot and take your pick
Out of the car to be sick!…

Song Lyric Sunday: Street

I just discovered Song Lyric Sunday and the theme for this week truly appeals to me. It is “Street”. Not that we’re required to stick to the theme, but I love me some challenge. Oh well, this was a pretty easy-peasy one. My biggest challenge was choosing between my two favorite songs involving “street”.

I am a big country music fan. I love the guitars, the energetic rhythm and the general feel to them. I also love most of the lyrics. Don’t tell my parents, as they’re pretty politically correct leftist folk music fans.

One day, I decided to play a pretty random country music playlist on Spotify. The first song that I truly loved was by Bobby Bare. I don’t remember which it was. I looked for more songs by him. One of them is “Streets of Baltimore”.

I was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands’ second-largest city, and grew up in a city of 150,000 people too. My husband, on the other hand, feels the city he grew up in is a large city with 11,000 residents. He loves living in a rural area. So, when I discovered “Streets of Baltimore”, I joked my husband could play this song if I ever want to move to a really large city again.

Song Title: Streets of Baltimore
Song writers: Tompall Glaser and Harlan Howard
Singer: Bobby Bare
Release Date: June 1966

I sold the farm to take my woman where she longed to be
We left our kin and all our friends back there in Tennssee
I bought those oneway tickets she had often begged me for
And they took us to the streets of Baltimore.

Her heart was filled with laughter when she saw those city lights
She said the prettiest place on earth is Baltimore at night
Oh well, a man feels proud to give his woman what she’s longing for
And I kind of liked the streets of Baltimore.

Well, I got myself a factory job, I ran an old machine
I bought a little cottage in a neighborhood serene
Yet every night when I came home with every muscle sore
She would drag me through the streets of Baltimore.

Well, I did my best to bring her back to what she used to be
But I soon learned she loved those bright lights much more than she loved me
Now I’m a going back on that same train that brought me here before
While my baby walks the streets of Baltimore.

Yes, my baby walks the streets of Baltimore…